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President Biden, on August 16, 2022, signed the Inflation Reduction Act ( P.L. 117-169) into law following its passage along party lines in both chambers of Congress.


President Biden signed the CHIPS and Science Act into law after it received bipartisan support in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.


Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen is seeking a detailed plan from the Internal Revenue Service on how it plans to spend to the $80 billion in additional funds that the agency received as part of the Inflation Reduction Act that was signed by President Biden on August 16, 2022.


National Taxpayer Advocate Erin Collins has taken an "unusual step" to appeal an Internal Revenue Service Deputy Commissioners’ decision directly to Commissioner Charles Rettig for reconsideration regarding the use of scanning technology for paper tax returns.


The IRS and the Security Summit partners have warned tax professionals to beware of evolving identity theft scams perpetrated through phishing emails and SMS-text that are designed to trick practitioners into opening embedded links or attachments that infect their computer systems with the potential to steal personal and client information such as passwords, bank account numbers, credit card numbers, or social security numbers.


The IRS has extended the deadlines for amending a retirement plan or individual retirement arrangement (IRA) to reflect certain provisions of Division O of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020, P. L. 116-94, known as the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019 (SECURE Act), and Section 104 of Division M of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020, known as the Bipartisan American Miners Act of 2019 (Miners Act). In addition, the IRS has extended the deadline for amending a retirement plan to reflect Section 2203 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), P. L. 116-136.The extended amendment deadline for (1) a qualified retirement plan or Code Sec. 403(b) plan (including an applicable collectively bargained plan) that is not a governmental plan or (2) an IRA is December 31, 2025.


The Treasury and IRS have issued final regulations eliminating the signature requirement for making a Code Sec. 754 election (section 754 election). The regulations finalize 2017 proposed regulations ( REG-116256-17), on which taxpayers were entitled to rely.


The American Institute of CPAs highlighted several challenges that tax practitioners are experiencing with the use of the Internal Revenue Service’s Practitioner Priority Service (PPS) line.


The American Institute of CPAs offered up suggestions to Congress, focused on the trust and estate proposals found within the fiscal year 2023 revenue proposal, as the legislative branch considers the White House Budget request.


If you file a joint return and your taxable income is less than that of your spouse, the "spousal" IRA rules may allow you to contribute up to $5,000 in 2009 (or $6,000 if you are 50 or older) to an individual retirement account (IRA) this year. A "spousal IRA" is a term more commonly used to describe an IRA set up for a nonworking, stay-at-home spouse.


Q. I converted my regular IRA to a Roth IRA when the account had a high value because the stock market was at an all time high. I paid the required tax on the conversion when the conversion proceeds pushed me up into the 36% tax bracket. The Roth IRA is now worth only about 40% of its original value. Is there any type of tax deduction that I can take based on this loss?


A taxpayer who may have misplaced or lost a copy of his tax return that was already filed with the IRS or whose copy may have been destroyed in a fire, flood, or other disaster may need information contained on that return in order to complete his or her return for the current year. In addition, an individual may be required by a governmental agency or other entity, such as a mortgage lender or the Small Business Administration, to supply a copy of his or a related party's tax return.


Making gifts is a useful, and often overlooked, tax strategy. However, when thinking about whether to make a gift, or gifts, to your children or other minors, the tax consequences must be evaluated very carefully. Many times, though, the tax consequences can be beneficial and lower your tax bill.


No use worrying. More than five million people every year have problems getting their refund checks so your situation is not uncommon. Nevertheless, you should be aware of the rules, and the steps to take if your refund doesn't arrive.

Throughout all of our lives, we have been told that if we don't want to work all of our life, we must plan ahead and save for retirement. We have also been urged to seek professional guidance to help plan our estates so that we can ensure that our loved ones will get the most out of the assets we have accumulated during our lifetime, with the least amount possible going to pay estate taxes.  What many of us likely have not thought about is how these two financial goals -- retirement and estate planning -- work together. 


You have just been notified that your tax return is going to be audited ... what now? While the best defense is always a good offense (translation: take steps to avoid an audit in the first place), in the event the IRS does come knocking on your door, here are some basic guidelines you can follow to increase the chances that you will come out of your audit unscathed.


When it comes to legal separation or divorce, there are many complex situations to address. A divorcing couple faces many important decisions and issues regarding alimony, child support, and the fair division of property. While most courts and judges will not factor in the impact of taxes on a potential property settlement or cash payments, it is important to realize how the value of assets transferred can be materially affected by the tax implications.


Raising a family in today's economy can be difficult and many people will agree that breaks are few -- more people mean more expenditures. However, in recent years, the IRS has passed legislation that borders on "family-friendly", with tax credits and other breaks benefiting families with children. Recent legislation also addresses the growing trend towards giving families a break.


Imagine you had a camera that could take a snapshot of your financial transactions over the course of a year. This snapshot would give you a chance to see the results of financial decisions you made during the course of the year -- good and bad. By using your recently filed Form 1040 as a "snapshot" of your past spending and investment habits, you can use this information to make better financial decisions in the current year.


An attractive benefit package is crucial to attract and retain talented workers. However, the expense of such packages can be cost-prohibitive to a small business. Establishing a tax-advantaged cafeteria plan can be an innovative way to provide employees with additional benefits without significantly adding to the cost of your overall benefit program.